Garlic Vs Black Garlic What's The Difference

Garlic vs. Black Garlic – What’s The Difference?

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Garlic is an herb that is a blessing for us. It has plenty of health benefits and provides a great taste to the food. We can’t say that garlic belongs to a specific cuisine, but it is a staple food item utilized in every part of the world.

Like garlic, we have another similar type of garlic called black garlic. Most of you must not be familiar with this concept, but black garlic is the fermented garlic that is enriched in antioxidants. Or we can also say that black garlic is the alternative to garlic.

The main concern is that what is the difference between garlic and black garlic, which would be: black garlic is processed or heated for up to sixty days while garlic is in raw form and unprocessed. The vitamin C content in raw garlic is much higher as compared to black garlic as black garlic is fermented, and certain nutrients are lost during processing.

The fiber and iron content in black garlic is higher as compared to garlic. Antioxidants are also three to four times higher in black garlic.  Another important component present in black garlic is SAC which stands for S-Ally cysteine, which helps in the absorption of allicin. SAC is not present in abundance in raw garlic.

To help you know more about garlic and black garlic, we have mentioned details and nutritional values related to both. Have a look at the points mentioned below to clear your views.

Garlic

Garlic belongs to the species of bulbous plant of the Allium genus. It is closely related to onions, leek and chive. Garlic is used in cooking to enhance the flavor but is also used as medicine to overcome many health problems and diseases.

Health Benefits

There are many health benefits of garlic, especially fresh garlic, which can’t be compared with the powdered form of garlic. In ancient history, garlic was utilized as medicine for treating all kinds of sickness. The most smallest of which was cold and leading towards the treatment of cancer.

It is said that the daily intake of a little amount of garlic decreases the prevalence of cold. In ancient history, garlic was used to treat cold. People often gave their sick children garlic so that they didn’t get cold, and in case they did, garlic was used as treatment.

According to some studies, it is also said that garlic was used to treat heart diseases and lower cholesterol levels. This would regulate normal blood pressure and normal sugar level. This is because garlic has antioxidant properties.

Garlic was used to treat and is still effective in treating all kinds of infections. It has antibacterial properties which prevent and treat many antibacterial infections. One can also consume garlic in green tea if you can’t consume it in raw form.

Lastly, garlic is used to decrease the chance of developing many kinds of cancers.  Studies in the past have proven that garlic effectively prevents lung cancer. It is also seen that garlic even destroys brain cancer cells and treats brain tumors.

Nutritional Properties

  • 109 kcal PER 100 Grams
  • 1 g Carbs
  • 5 g Fat
  • 1 g Fiber
  • 017 g Sodium
  • 01 mg Potassium
  • 181 mg Calcium
  • 7 mg Iron
  • 25 mg Magnesium

Black Garlic

Black garlic is a sort of garlic that is fermented. The fresh garlic is turned black and tastes like molasses. Or we can say that it has umami and a nutty flavor, which enhances the taste of dishes. Mostly black garlic is used to prepare the sauces.

The black garlic is expensive and is caramelized garlic form. Black garlic is famous and mostly consumed in Asia, making it more expensive than truffles. Some other facts about black garlic are mentioned below.

Health Benefits

The benefits of black garlic are almost the same as that of fresh garlic. Black garlic is the best form to add more antioxidant content to our diet and contains about three to four times more antioxidants than raw garlic. These antioxidant properties help in lowering inflammation in the body.

Another important factor black garlic plays are fighting against diabetes. Many studies have shown that black garlic lowers high blood sugar levels and is good for maintaining blood sugar levels in the blood. It is also shown that black garlic is good at lowering blood pressure and reducing the heart’s stress.

Like fresh garlic, black garlic also lowers cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood and prevents the risk of heart disease. Black garlic is also beneficial in reducing the growth of colon cancer. Some of the compounds present in black garlic block the free radicals, reducing the damage done by cancer cells.

It is also shown in many studies that black garlic is good for boosting up the immune system. This is because it boosts white blood cell production, which helps fight infections and bacteria. All these health benefits are worth it spending money on black garlic.

Nutritional Properties

  • 210 kcal per 100 Grams
  • 5 g Carbs
  • 3 g Fats
  • 8 g Fiber
  • 0932 g Sodium
  • 13 mg Calcium
  • 1 mg Iron
  • 4 mg Zinc
  • 52 mg Magnesium

So, What’s The Difference Between Garlic and Raw Garlic?

Summarizing the topic as mentioned above into main points includes the highlights of differences between garlic and black garlic. The major differences are:

  1. Raw garlic is lower in calories than black garlic, so people on a diet don’t go for black garlic.
  2. The vitamin C content in raw garlic is much higher than black garlic as black garlic is fermented, and certain nutrients are lost during processing.
  3. The fiber and iron content in black garlic is higher as compared to garlic.
  4. Antioxidants are also three to four times higher in black garlic.
  5. Another important component present in black garlic is SAC, which stands for S-Ally cysteine, which helps absorb allicin. SAC is not present in abundance in raw garlic.
  6. Black garlic is processed or heated for up to sixty days, while garlic is raw form, naturally occurring and unprocessed.

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